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  • Collaborative Divorce: A New Paradigm
    Collaborative Divorce: A New Paradigm
    by Pauline H. Tesler, Peggy Thompson
  • The Collaborative Way to Divorce: The Revolutionary Method That Results in Less Stress, Lower Costs, and Happier Kids--Without Going to Court
    The Collaborative Way to Divorce: The Revolutionary Method That Results in Less Stress, Lower Costs, and Happier Kids--Without Going to Court
    by Stuart G. Webb, Ronald D. Ousky
  • Stop Fighting Over The Kids: Resolving Day-to-Day Custody Conflict in Divorce Situations (Mike Mastracci's Divorce Without Dishonor)
    Stop Fighting Over The Kids: Resolving Day-to-Day Custody Conflict in Divorce Situations (Mike Mastracci's Divorce Without Dishonor)
    by Mike Mastracci
  • Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most
    Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most
    by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, Sheila Heen
  • Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High
    Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High
    by Kerry Patterson

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Saturday
Nov172012

Same Sex Marriage - Part Two

On election day, Maryland became one of a handful of states to legalize gay and lesbian marriage.  Now, not only are marriages performed elsewhere valid in this state, but now same sex couples can marry here as well.

Wednesday
Sep192012

Our New Home

This is technically not family law news, except as it relates to this office.  We are moving, probably by the end of October 2012, to our new home at 129-12 W. Patrick Street, Frederick, Maryland.  We're not giving up our Montgomery County roots, however, as we will spend every Tuesday and Friday afternoon in Rockville, at our office in the Collaborative Practice Center of Montgomery County, at 51 Monroe Street, Suite 1900, Rockville, Maryland.

Wednesday
Sep192012

Same Sex Marriage

The Maryland State Legislature passed a law recognizing same sex marriages performed in other states.  The matter was passed by such a close vote, that it is a referendum item on this November's ballot.  This legislation is important, because as other states recognize and perform same sex marriages, many of those couples will ultimately reside in this state.  Without the legislation, these couples are without the means to divide assets they have acquired during their marriage, except by reference to contract and real estate laws, thus frustrating their intent when they purchased the property.  Also, such legislation helps such couples resolve the issues related to their children as co-parents, and not just as one parent and one third party outsider who has no rights.  We are hopeful that the referendum, like the legislation, will pass.

Tuesday
Oct182011

New Grounds for Absolute Divorce

As of October 1, 2011, Maryland no longer requires that spouses be separated for two years or more in order to obtain a "no fault" absolute divorce.  The period of time in which the spouses must live separate and apart without cohabitation for a "no fault" divorce is now the same as for the other grounds - one year.  That does not mean fault is dead in Maryland, as it is still relevant in determining an alimony award and in deciding how to divide the marital estate.

Tuesday
Oct182011

Uniform Collaborative Law Update

Texas has passed the Uniform Collaborative Law Act.  It has been introduced in Alabama, District of Columbia, Massachusetts, and Hawaii.