Powered by Squarespace
  • Collaborative Divorce: A New Paradigm
    Collaborative Divorce: A New Paradigm
    by Pauline H. Tesler, Peggy Thompson
  • The Collaborative Way to Divorce: The Revolutionary Method That Results in Less Stress, Lower Costs, and Happier Kids--Without Going to Court
    The Collaborative Way to Divorce: The Revolutionary Method That Results in Less Stress, Lower Costs, and Happier Kids--Without Going to Court
    by Stuart G. Webb, Ronald D. Ousky
  • Stop Fighting Over The Kids: Resolving Day-to-Day Custody Conflict in Divorce Situations (Mike Mastracci's Divorce Without Dishonor)
    Stop Fighting Over The Kids: Resolving Day-to-Day Custody Conflict in Divorce Situations (Mike Mastracci's Divorce Without Dishonor)
    by Mike Mastracci
  • Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most
    Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most
    by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, Sheila Heen
  • Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High
    Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes are High
    by Kerry Patterson

Legal Disclaimer

 

The information in the KarenRobbinsLaw.com website is provided as a general reference work as a public service. The reader is advised to check for changes to current law and to consult with a qualified attorney on any legal issue. The use of this material does not create an attorney-client relationship with Karen Robbins, Attorney at Law. When transmitting information over this website, you understand and agree that Karen Robbins, Attorney at Law will have no duty to keep confidential the information.

 Because the information posted on this website and provided in the accompanying podcasts and blogs is prepared for a general audience, without investigation into the facts of each particular case, it is not legal advice: Karen Robbins does not have an attorney-client relationship with you. The thoughts and commentary about the law contained on this site is provided as a service to the community, and does not constitute solicitation or provision of legal advice.

While we endeavor to provide accurate information at this website and in the podcasts and blogs, we cannot guarantee that the information provided here (or linked to from this site) is accurate, complete, or adequate. We provide this general legal information on an ‘as-is’ basis. We make no warranties and disclaim liability for damages resulting from its use. Legal advice must be tailored to the specific circumstances of each case, and laws are constantly changing, so nothing provided at this site or in the accompanying podcasts, should be used as a substitute for the advice of competent counsel.

Finally, using this website or sending email to the host or any guests on the podcast does not create an attorney-client relationship.

The material in this website may be considered advertising under applicable rules.

 

Questions You Want Answered > General Family Law Information > What should I do before I leave my spouse?

Search the FAQ for entries containing:

1.   Decide whether you really want a divorce.  This seems like a very simplistic response, but it is the most important question you can ask.  Would marriage counselling help?  Do I just need some time to think?  This is a very important decision with serious, long ranging consequences.  You should be certain before you go.

2.  Talk to a lawyer before you do anything.  Once you have left, it's too late.  Maryland laws of separation, divorce, custody and support are complicated, and you need the advice of a professional before you do something that may adversely impact your case, and by extension, your future life.

3.  If you have had an affair, do not tell your spouse or anyone else before you speak with a lawyer.  Maryland divorce law is fault based, and adultery is a ground for divorce that belongs to the spouse not having the affair, and it can affect property distribution and spousal support.  In Maryland, it is also a crime.  A lawyer can best advise you about whether, when and how to reveal this information in a way that does not hurt your case.

4.  Gather as much information as possible about what you and your spouse own and what you and your spouse owe.  What I mean by "gather information" is make copies of any documents that show what you or your spouse own, what the items are worth and how much you owe.  Make copies of those paers for yourself and keep them in a safe place, to which your spouse does not have access.  Take that information to a lawyer and talk with the lawyer about how you can best safeguard your money and your property during divorce.  Protect your credit by determining which of your credit cards are joint and which are in your or your spouse's sole name, and freeze or close those joint accounts. 

5.  If you have children, do not leave the house without some kind of agreement with your spouse about where the children will live, at least temporarily, and when they will see each parent.  Most courts in Maryland do not consider withholding child access to be an emergency, and it could be many months before the court could decide, even on a temporary basis, when the children will see each parent.

Last updated on September 4, 2013 by Karen Robbins, Attorney at Law