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Questions You Want Answered > What is the Court Process? > I've been served with a Summons and Complaint. What do I do?

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First, don't worry that you have to do something NOW.  After you have been served, you have thirty days to file a response, sixty days if you were served outside of Maryland, and ninety days if you were served outside the United States.  When I say "file a response," all that means is that you have to answer the allegations in the Complaint and make sure the answer is filed at the courthouse.  Although thirty days might not seem like a lot of time, it really is plenty.  It gives you enough time to interview one or more lawyers to find the right fit for you.  If you interview lawyers and still can't find the right fit, don't panic.  You can go to the Maryland Judiciary website and download the forms you need, or go to the courthouse and get a copy of the form.  Your answer can always be edited later, when you hire a lawyer, but it is important to file the answer within the thirty day period.

Last updated on September 4, 2013 by Karen Robbins, Attorney at Law